The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

Social Media Resources

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Social Media Resources

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

Artwork & Logos

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Social Media Resources

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

Artwork & Logos

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Social Media Resources

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

We’d love to see how you share these recipes with your shoppers through demos, social media, etc. Tag us at EasyHomeMeals on Facebook @_easyhomemeals on Instagram and @EasyHomeMeals on Twitter.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column]

Infographics & Images

Print or share these infographics by posting them on your websites, in newsletters and on social media!

[/vc_row]

Myths & Facts About Frozen Food

Organize Your Refrigerator Tips

The Story of Frozen Food... From Farm to Table

Why Frozen Food is the Smart Choice

Myths & Facts About Frozen Food

March 2014 Infographic

Frozen Food Helping with Food Waste

2017 Food Waste Infographic

Real Food...In Your Freezer

2013 March Infographic

Frozen Foods Have Never Been Hotter

2018 Frozen Food Infographic

Artwork & Logos

Social Media Resources

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

  • SQUASH: Butternut squash (1 cup) is a good source of fiber (11 %DV) and potassium (14 %DV), and an excellent source of Vitamin A (298 %DV) & C (49 %DV). Purchase frozen cubed squash and roast it in the oven and serve as a side dish or on a salad, or puree squash into creamy soups or pasta sauces. Warm up with our Creamy (But Creamless!) Butternut Squash Soup!
  • CRANBERRIES: Cranberries (1 cup) are a good source of fiber (16%DV) and an excellent source of Vitamin C, packed with phytonutrients and antioxidants. Cranberries are so versatile – they can be tossed into a vegetable side dish, added to a Thanksgiving stuffing, simmered into a sauce, or pureed and used as a sugar replacement in baked goods or as a topping on a dessert. Bring our Cranberry Cheese Puffs to your next get-together!
  • BRUSSELS SPROUTS:  Brussels sprouts (1 cup) are a good source of fiber (10 %DV) and an excellent source of Vitamin A (25 %DV), C (142 %DV) and K (147 %DV). Roast or sauté frozen Brussels sprouts and serve them as a side or in a grain bowl, or simply on a charcuterie board to add fiber to your appetizer. Serve up our colorful Cranberry Brussels Sprouts at your holiday party.

We’d love to see how you share these recipes with your shoppers through demos, social media, etc. Tag us at EasyHomeMeals on Facebook @_easyhomemeals on Instagram and @EasyHomeMeals on Twitter.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column]

Infographics & Images

Print or share these infographics by posting them on your websites, in newsletters and on social media!

[/vc_row]

Myths & Facts About Frozen Food

Organize Your Refrigerator Tips

The Story of Frozen Food... From Farm to Table

Why Frozen Food is the Smart Choice

Myths & Facts About Frozen Food

March 2014 Infographic

Frozen Food Helping with Food Waste

2017 Food Waste Infographic

Real Food...In Your Freezer

2013 March Infographic

Frozen Foods Have Never Been Hotter

2018 Frozen Food Infographic

Artwork & Logos

Social Media Resources

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

Fall Recipe Cards

  • SQUASH: Butternut squash (1 cup) is a good source of fiber (11 %DV) and potassium (14 %DV), and an excellent source of Vitamin A (298 %DV) & C (49 %DV). Purchase frozen cubed squash and roast it in the oven and serve as a side dish or on a salad, or puree squash into creamy soups or pasta sauces. Warm up with our Creamy (But Creamless!) Butternut Squash Soup!
  • CRANBERRIES: Cranberries (1 cup) are a good source of fiber (16%DV) and an excellent source of Vitamin C, packed with phytonutrients and antioxidants. Cranberries are so versatile – they can be tossed into a vegetable side dish, added to a Thanksgiving stuffing, simmered into a sauce, or pureed and used as a sugar replacement in baked goods or as a topping on a dessert. Bring our Cranberry Cheese Puffs to your next get-together!
  • BRUSSELS SPROUTS:  Brussels sprouts (1 cup) are a good source of fiber (10 %DV) and an excellent source of Vitamin A (25 %DV), C (142 %DV) and K (147 %DV). Roast or sauté frozen Brussels sprouts and serve them as a side or in a grain bowl, or simply on a charcuterie board to add fiber to your appetizer. Serve up our colorful Cranberry Brussels Sprouts at your holiday party.

We’d love to see how you share these recipes with your shoppers through demos, social media, etc. Tag us at EasyHomeMeals on Facebook @_easyhomemeals on Instagram and @EasyHomeMeals on Twitter.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column]

Infographics & Images

Print or share these infographics by posting them on your websites, in newsletters and on social media!

[/vc_row]

Myths & Facts About Frozen Food

Organize Your Refrigerator Tips

The Story of Frozen Food... From Farm to Table

Why Frozen Food is the Smart Choice

Myths & Facts About Frozen Food

March 2014 Infographic

Frozen Food Helping with Food Waste

2017 Food Waste Infographic

Real Food...In Your Freezer

2013 March Infographic

Frozen Foods Have Never Been Hotter

2018 Frozen Food Infographic

Artwork & Logos

Social Media Resources

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet

RD Toolkit

NFRA is making connections with Supermarket Registered Dietitians by providing quarterly toolkits full of valuable resources that they can use to promote frozen and refrigerated foods to shoppers in-store. Below you’ll find resources, assets and tools from the 2019  newsletters sent to our contact list of RDs.

Share this content with your company’s Registered Dietitians and contact us at nfra@nfraweb.org to receive future toolkits. If you are interested in contributing recipes, please contact us for the nutritional criteria at nfra@nfraweb.org or 717-657-8601.

Tips

Click the images below for a printable PDF. Share these helpful tips on your social channels, newsletters, websites, etc. or print out for shoppers to grab in-store!

[/vc_column_text]

[/vc_column][/vc_row]
RD Toolkit Tip Button
RD Toolkit Tip Button2
RD Toolkit Tip Button3
RD Toolkit Tip Button4

Fall Recipe Cards

  • SQUASH: Butternut squash (1 cup) is a good source of fiber (11 %DV) and potassium (14 %DV), and an excellent source of Vitamin A (298 %DV) & C (49 %DV). Purchase frozen cubed squash and roast it in the oven and serve as a side dish or on a salad, or puree squash into creamy soups or pasta sauces. Warm up with our Creamy (But Creamless!) Butternut Squash Soup!
  • CRANBERRIES: Cranberries (1 cup) are a good source of fiber (16%DV) and an excellent source of Vitamin C, packed with phytonutrients and antioxidants. Cranberries are so versatile – they can be tossed into a vegetable side dish, added to a Thanksgiving stuffing, simmered into a sauce, or pureed and used as a sugar replacement in baked goods or as a topping on a dessert. Bring our Cranberry Cheese Puffs to your next get-together!
  • BRUSSELS SPROUTS:  Brussels sprouts (1 cup) are a good source of fiber (10 %DV) and an excellent source of Vitamin A (25 %DV), C (142 %DV) and K (147 %DV). Roast or sauté frozen Brussels sprouts and serve them as a side or in a grain bowl, or simply on a charcuterie board to add fiber to your appetizer. Serve up our colorful Cranberry Brussels Sprouts at your holiday party.

We’d love to see how you share these recipes with your shoppers through demos, social media, etc. Tag us at EasyHomeMeals on Facebook @_easyhomemeals on Instagram and @EasyHomeMeals on Twitter.

Infographics & Images

Print or share these infographics by posting them on your websites, in newsletters and on social media!

Myths & Facts About Frozen Food

Organize Your Refrigerator Tips

The Story of Frozen Food... From Farm to Table

Why Frozen Food is the Smart Choice

Myths & Facts About Frozen Food

March 2014 Infographic

Frozen Food Helping with Food Waste

2017 Food Waste Infographic

Real Food...In Your Freezer

2013 March Infographic

Frozen Foods Have Never Been Hotter

2018 Frozen Food Infographic

Artwork & Logos

Social Media Resources

 

As shoppers seek healthy meal ideas, we encourage you to remind them of the endless benefits of frozen food – from convenience to health. We’ve created an infographic to help debunk the myths around frozen food and inform shoppers about the journey from fresh to frozen. Share this to shoppers around National Nutrition Month or March Frozen Food Month as a way to talk about the nutritional benefits of frozen food and where our food comes from.

Frozen Foods to the Rescue!

 

  • Nutrition: Produce is picked at peak of ripeness and frozen within hours, locking in nutrients and flavor without change to the carbohydrate, protein, or fat content.
  • Convenience: When you buy frozen fruits and veggies, the shelling, seeding and cutting are already done. You are paying for 100% edible food.
  • Food Waste: No spoilage and $ savings – eat only what you need and put the rest back in the freezer; freezing technology and eco-friendly packaging keep frozen foods fresher longer.

 

June Dairy Month resources:

Debunking common Dairy myths

With a swirl of confusion around dairy, we find this a perfect opportunity to educate your shoppers about the benefits of dairy — a nutrient powerhouse containing nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. We’ve debunked a few common myths about dairy that you’re welcome to share with shoppers:

  • Myth: “Dairy makes you fat”
    Fact: No single food will make you fat. It’s all about balance and how much of an item you consume. Dairy foods such as low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt are foundational foods in healthy dietary patterns recommended by the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines [2] and USDA MyPlate recommends 3 cups for ages 9 and older [3]. Additionally, dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt contain high-quality protein, which may help to manage weight and feel satiated [4].
  • Myth: “Those with lactose intolerance must avoid all dairy products”
    Fact: This may not always be the case. Dairy products contain different amounts of lactose – thus, certain dairy products may be tolerated more than others or in varying quantities [5]. For example, hard cheeses, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt contain small amounts of lactose. The good news is there are many lactose-free dairy options in the refrigerated aisle.
  • Myth: “Milk contains antibiotics”
    Fact: All milk sold in stores is antibiotic free [6]. While a farmer may use antibiotics to treat a sick cow, there are strict government standards and protocols to ensure no antibiotics are found in the milk you buy at the store.

The reality is – dairy doesn’t work for everyone (whether an allergy, lactose-intolerance, vegan/vegetarian beliefs, etc.). Choose what works best for you. Maybe that means you can only tolerate certain dairy products or maybe just in certain quantities… but even if you can’t tolerate it at all, you’re still in luck because there is an abundance of delicious dairy alternatives on the market these days – soy, almond, coconut, oat, etc.

1. Consumer Reports. (2017). How to Organize a Refrigerator for Maximum Freshness. Retrieved from https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-organize-a-refrigerator/.
2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2015). 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. Retrieved from https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/.
3. USDA Choose My Plate, Dairy Recommendation. Retrieved from https://www.choosemyplate.gov/dairy.
4. National Dairy Council. (2017). Protein is naturally found in a variety of animal and plant foods. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2017/power-of-protein-quality-matters.
5. National Dairy Council. (2016). What is Lactose Intolerance? Find Lactose Intolerance Facts Here. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/lactose-intolerance-facts
6. National Dairy Council. (2016). Milk and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://dairygood.org/content/2016/milk-and-antibiotics-what-you-need-to-know

Recipes

Click the image for a printable recipe card to share with shoppers in-store or online in newsletters, websites and social media.

Herb Baked Salmon on Asparagus

Carrot Spirals with Grilled Chicken and Marinara Sauce

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Lemon Pepper Shrimp & Veggie Bowls

Tropical Smoothie

Power Berry Smoothie Bowl

Avocado Toast with Veggie Bacon

Summertime Silk Granita

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Orange Citrus Salad

Oh So Strawberry Cheesecake Pops

Lemon Pepper Salmon

Sizzlin’ Spring Shrimp Skewers

Italian Tomatoes with Herbed Cheese

Grilled Veggie Sliders

Blistered Sugar Snap Peas

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Mini Star Sandwich Skewers

Pear Waldorf Salad

Berry Good Waffle Sammie

Fro Yo Mini Pies

Chik'N Parmesan Bites

Quick Chicken, Broccoli & Pasta Skillet